Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery

Past Events - 2018

Further Information

All events are subject to change. To keep up-to-date with us, join our mailing list.


Close-Up image of a vinyl record with a bright blur cover

Art + Law Series

Appropriation art, authorship and copyright law

Appropriation artists are seen to re-use the work of other artists, or re-contextualise ready-made objects, making claims of both art and authorship. How does or how should copyright law respond to this artistic practice?

Join panellists Jani McCutcheon, Associate Professor at the UWA Law School and HERE&NOW18 artists Dr Alex Spremberg and Dr Perdita Phillips to discuss the concept and relevance of authorship in contemporary art, and how it aligns with copyright law’s understanding of authorship.

This event is the first of a series of Art + Law discussions held in collaboration with the Law School at UWA.

UWA Campus Partner: Law School, Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education

Image: Alex Spremberg, The Sound of White, Even (detail), 2017-2018, enamel on vinyl records, 215 x 473cm © the artist


old photograph of man on a jeep pulling a cow in country

Friday Talk
Aboriginal photographies: Documenting Gibb River Station

with Jane Lydon, Professor and Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History at UWA

Join Jane Lydon as she discusses the role of photography in history making in colonial Australia and in relation to Stockyards and Saddles: A story of Gibb River Station.

UWA Campus Partner: Australian History, School of Humanities

Image: Bull Catching, Colin Russ Collection, c. 1980s


extreme close up of a camera lens

Talking Allowed: The Art of Surveillance

with Dr David Glance, Director, UWA Centre for Software Practice

The way in which artists have represented the nature of surveillance illustrates art’s unique and powerful ability to explore, explain, and critique surveillance’s role in society. This exploration highlights humanity’s conflicted relationship with technology. A relationship that brings a price for every benefit, and a cost which is often borne by those not in control of the technology including those who struggle to understand it.

This talk will explore how surveillance is viewed as the “benevolent, omniscient eye of God” by artist Miriam Stannage as a contrast to the largely unseen tool of control and oppression by almost everyone else.

Artists have explored not only the obvious forms of surveillance through video but increasingly through the digital footprints on the internet and even the discarded parts of genetic material we leave when we drop a piece of chewed gum.

Talking Allowed is a presentation series offered in partnership with the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.  

Event details

 

A GIF show two images one of a closeup of a vinyl record painted blue and another of sculpture with a woman face on a wooden tray with pointed sculptures as for hair

Exhibitions opening night: HERE&NOW18 + No Second Thoughts

We are pleased to invite you to the launch of Season 3 with the opening of two new exhibitions at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

HERE&NOW18: Besides it is always the others who die
50 years since the death of Marcel Duchamp 1968-2018

Artists: Julie Dowling | Carly Lynch | Peter & Molly | Perdita Phillips | Bjoern Rainer-Adamson | Alex Spremberg
Curated by Anna Louise Richardson

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No Second Thoughts: Reflections on the ARTEMIS Women’s Art Forum
A project by the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art.

With new works by Penny Bovell, Jo Darbyshire, Teelah George, and Taylor Reudavey
Curated by Gemma Weston

Opening Night

GIF Artwork 1: Alex Spremberg, The Sound of White, Even (detail), 2017-2018, enamel on vinyl records, 215 x 473cm © the artist
GIF Artwork 2: Anne Jeppe, Venus Con-Cave (detail), assemblage from found materials with painted plaster cast, c 1987. © Courtesy the artist

 

jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Artist Talk: George Haynes

Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection

Join artist George Haynes who will share insights about his own work and that of his contemporaries exhibited in Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s –1960s.

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Girl playing a xylophone musical instrument

Performance: Piñata Co-Lab

Australian Soundscapes

Co-Lab is an annual commissioning project that brings together UWA composition and percussion departments, which has produced more than 25 new works to date. In 2018, these talented young composers create new and imaginative works for percussion, inspired by works in the exhibition Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection.

Campus Partner: UWA Conservatorium of Music

Image: UWA Conservatorium of Music, Piñata Co-Lab.


Self portrait of artist Jenny Watson wearing a white blouse and smoking a cigarette

Friday Talk: Feminism, Collaboration and Community

with Dr Chantal Bourgault du Coudray

Dr Chantal Bourgault du Coudray teaches gender and cultural history at UWA, and is also the Academic Coordinator of the McCusker Centre for Citizenship.

Join Chantal to explore connections between feminism, collaboration and community through reference to artworks in the exhibition Authentic Determination. These include new works developed by artist Brigid Noone in response to selected works from the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, as well as works by artists in her own network.

Campus Partner: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

Image: Jenny Watson, Self Portrait (Light Fire Version) For Myself (detail), 1980, pastel and wash on paper, 56 x 76cm, CCWA 723. Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, The University of Western Australia


Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Friday Talk: Travellers in the Land

with Dr Shino Konishi, senior lecturer at the UWA School of Humanities, and the School of Indigenous Studies

Dr Shino Konishi, a senior lecturer in the School of Humanities and the School of Indigenous Studies at UWA specialises in Indigenous history and has a particular interest in encounters between European explorers and travellers and Aboriginal people.

Join Dr Konishi to explore the installation and the forms in this exhibition. 

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

LWAG Signs: Auslan Interpreted Tour

For adults with hearing loss and their friends

Experience the artwork at LWAG in Australian Sign Language. Join us for a free tour in Auslan of the current exhibitions guided by a gallery staff member and interpreter from Auslan Stage Left.

Tours are free to attend and also open to friends, families and carers. Light refreshments will be provided after the tour. 

Community Partner: Auslan Stage Left   

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Can Touch This: Tactile and Verbal Description Tour

For visitors with visual impairments, and their carers, friends and family

Join us for a touch and verbal descriptive tour of the current exhibitions. A trained guide delivers descriptions of the visual elements of artworks exhibited, along with tactile opportunities using mixed media and 3d-printed models of the artworks.

Tours are free to attend and open to friends, families and carers. Light refreshments will be provided after the tour. 

Community Partner: DADAA (Disability in the Arts, Disadvantage in the Arts).   

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Detail of artwork made of painted wood depicting Indian deity

Art and Mindfulness: Going Slow

Visual Art x Mindfulness Tour

Slow your day down by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display.

We begin this session with a close observation of selected artworks from the exhibitions In Light of Shadows and Authentic Determination, followed by an informal discussion on themes of empathy and compassion.

This program runs bi-monthly and is open to all. Sign up for a single session or register for all dates. 

Image: I. Wayan Nunkal, The Abduction of Sita, Punjung Village, Bali, Indonesia, painted wood, steel P. Bridge Collection, Berndt Museum [1982/0006.1-11]


 
Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Let's Meet at LWAG

For visitors living with Alzheimer's, and their carers, friends or family

Join us for the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery’s quarterly program for people living with dementia and their carers or family members. This event provides a forum for conversation through the shared viewing and exploration of artworks on display – highlighting themes, artists, and exhibitions at LWAG.

Free to attend. Light refreshments will be provided. 

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Friday Talk

Modern Australian Landscapes in Literature

Modern Australian landscape tradition is captured in the spectrum of works selected from the UWA Art Collection by Curator Sally Quin. View the exhibition and join Associate Professor Tanya Dalziell as she discusses selected works and considers some relationships with contemporary Australian literature.

Campus Partner: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. 

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Black and white illustration of Indian hawkers

Talking Allowed: Why Speak English? Nationalism and the order(ing) of language in colonial Melbourne

with Dr Nadia Rhook, Lecturer, School of Humanities, and Indigenous Studies, The University of Western Australia

You probably speak English everyday, but have you ever stopped to think about how and why English came to be so widely spoken in Australia?

This talk explores the spatial order of language in 1890s Melbourne, from the boarding houses and shops of the polyglot Little Lon area to the men’s clubs, banks and Parliament of Anglophone dominated Bourke and Collins Streets. We’ll track how this linguistic order was produced through the colonisation of Kulin land and focus in on the dynamic decade of the 1890s; an era that saw the politics of Chinese and South Asian migration intensify in ways that culminated in the use of a language test to enact racial exclusion, which would remain a cornerstone of the White Australia Policy for decades to follow.

This talk opens up thinking about the ways that language works as a tool of racial inclusion and exclusion; thinking about how, and where, the ability to speak English became bound up with Australian identity.

Talking Allowed is an event series in collaboration with UWA Institute of Advanced Studies on the second Wednesday of every month, where a researcher or artist will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture, followed by discussion and debate. 

Campus Partner: Institute of Advanced Studies, UWA.

Image: Indian Hawkers


Image of kris which is an asymmetrical dagger

Friday Talk

Kris: Power and history in Bali

Join cultural and social anthropologist Professor Lyn Parker (Asian Studies, UWA), whose research includes the anthropology of Indonesia, women and gender relations, to view the kris (asymmetrical daggers with distinctive blade-patterning) in the exhibition In Light of Shadows. Learn more about the place of kris, considered as magically powerful objects in Balinese history and culture.

Campus Partner: Discipline of Asian Studies, UWA.

Image: Keris, 20th century, Indonesia, metal, wood. RM & CH Berndt Estate, Berndt Museum [1994/0050.1-2]


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Medicine and Art

Professional Development Workshops

Free professional development workshops aimed at medical and health professionals of all levels. Registration is required. Limited to 20 participants. 

Develop visual language and refine communication skills through close observation of artworks. Ioana Vlad and Janice Lally will guide participants to become more comfortable with ambiguity and develop reflective practice through the exploration of art and its meanings. The workshops are designed to enrich empathic skills while enhancing social and cultural awareness.

  • 7 June, In Light of Shadows: View the exhibition and explore notions of light and shadow in different sociocultural imaginings and understandings – including ideas of knowledge, mortality, morality, power and memory – while discussing issues pertaining to mental health.
  • 16 August, Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Examine the exhibition and identify visual elements that contribute to creating an impression of the land, full of vitality and energy. Discuss issues of cultural identity. 

Dr Ioana Vlad MD FACEM is an Emergency Medicine Physician, Clinical Toxicologist and co-Director of Emergency Medicine Training at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, WA.

Dr Janice Lally PhD (History and Philosophy of Science) is Curator of Academic and Public Programs at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

 

Campus Partner: Emergency Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Photo of ceramics by Alana McVeigh

Let's Talk Shop

with Alana McVeigh

Alana McVeigh is one of Western Australia’s premier ceramicists whose delicate porcelain vessels focus on simplicity and form.

Join us to hear Alana discuss how she explores the clay using her bare fingers and her consummate application of pure colour glazes, which appear so deceptively simple. It is this combination of unobtrusive technical discipline and sheer beauty that distinguishes her work. Alana’s work will be available for sale at this event.

Image: Ceramics by Alana McVeigh


Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Exhibition tour and high tea with Stewart Scambler

Stewart Scambler: Fragment

Arriving in Perth from England as a young boy, Stewart Scambler was struck by the natural environment and, in particular, the intense light of Western Australia – which significantly influenced his practice as a potter. On his property at York, Scambler grows trees to stoke his wood-fired kiln and collects materials to make his own clay body, from which he makes the vessels and domestic wares he is well-known for.

In the exhibition Stewart Scambler: Fragment at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, Scambler presents a new body of work, a striking assembly of large-scale sculptural forms and murals inspired by his recent journey through the Pilbara and Kimberley. Join us as the artist walks through the exhibition and shares stories of his practice over high tea.

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon


Papercutting pattern by artist Tusif Ahmed

Exhibition: Paigham -i- Ramadan (Message of Ramadan)

Paigham -i- Ramadan (Message of Ramadan) is an exhibition from UWA’s Centre for Muslim States and Societies showcasing papercutting by artist Tusif Ahmed and conceived as part of Ramadan - the ninth month of the Islamic calendar where Muslims fast from dawn to dusk. The intricate and fragile works are hand-cut, utilising a fusion of old Chinese techniques and Islamic patterns found throughout the Middle East.

Campus Partners: UWA Centre for Muslim States and Societies 

Image: Tusif Ahmed, The Ideal, 2015. Papercutting Art , 123 x 84 cm.


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Art and Mindfulness: Going Slow

Visual Art x Mindfulness Tour

Slow your day down by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display at the exhibitions Stewart Scambler: Fragment and Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s -1960s.

We begin this session with a close observation of selected artworks from the exhibition, followed by an informal discussion on themes of empathy and compassion.

This program runs bi-monthly and is open to all. Sign up for a single session or register for all dates. 

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Image of man holding a new born baby

Exhibition: WAMSS Photography

Every year, final year medical students from the University of Western Australia spend four weeks in a clinical elective unit, choosing to step outside their comfort zone for an experience that enriches their future as clinicians. Replacing the stethoscope with a camera, their photographs in this exhibition highlight the journeys they have taken, and the global health and sociocultural issues observed in far-flung places.

Campus Partners: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences and the Western Australian Medical Students’ Society (WAMSS). 

Image: Samuel Khor, My First Catch, Northern Provincial Hospital, Vanuatu


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Professional Development Workshop for School Teachers

Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection

Education kits for the exhibition Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s -1960s have been developed in line with WA SCASA requirements and address VET competency criteria for school teachers.

Learn more about these education resources in a workshop led by educator Erin Knight. 

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Curator's Talk and Tour

Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection

The modern Australian landscape tradition is captured in the spectrum of works selected from the UWA Art Collection by Curator Sally Quin. Join her as she discusses how formal experimentation of the post-war period has been used to reveal underlying structures of the bush, through the iconic imagery of Fred Williams, Sidney Nolan, Howard Taylor, and others.

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Artist and curator in conversation

with Stewart Scambler and Sally Quin

Potter Stewart Scambler and Curator Sally Quin take us through Scambler’s stunning exhibition (Stewart Scambler: Fragment) of large-scale works inspired by his journey through the Pilbara and Kimberley regions of Western Australia.

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon



Image of women wearing a hijab

Talking Allowed: Talking Aloud about Head Covering (and other relevant clothes)

with Krishna Sen FAHA, Professor Emerita, Social Sciences, UWA

"In Australia, in March 2017 a red-headed Anglophone woman covered herself from head to toe in a black garb and showed up in parliament. In India, in 2013, 1 February was declared International Hijab day and women of all faiths were invited to don this particular form of clothing. In Indonesia, when I first started asking young women in their 30’s why they wore the hijab when their mothers didn’t, friends who had my best interest at heart responded: ‘Ibu, this is a very sensitive question. Please be careful’.

In each of the three nations where I have spent my life-time, and indeed in many other parts of the world, there appears to be some sort of a moral panic around a particular item of women’s clothing on all sides of the argument. Is there something particular about the hijab in our time or is ‘to cover or not to cover’ always a central political question?"

Krishna Sen, a Bengali Indian by birth, Australian by choice, is Professor Emerita and Senior Research Fellow in Social Sciences, UWA. She is internationally recognised for her research and publications on Indonesian media and politics. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and a member of the New Colombo Plan Reference Group.

Talking Allowed is an event series in collaboration with UWA Institute of Advanced Studies on the second Wednesday of every month, where a researcher or artist will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture, followed by discussion and debate. 

Campus Partner: Institute of Advanced Studies 


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Season 2 Exhibitions Launch
Stewart Scambler: Fragment + Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s + Authentic Determination

Join us for the launch of our Season 2 program of exhibitions: 


Stewart Scambler: Fragment
Presenting a new body of work by potter Stewart Scambler - a striking assembly of large-scale sculptural forms and murals, inspired by Scambler's journey through the Pilbara and Kimberley regions of Western Australia.

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Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s - 1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection
Exploring work in the modern landscape tradition in Australian art with paintings by Elise Blumann, Sam Fullbrook, Audrey Greenhalgh, Guy Grey-Smith, Godfrey Miller, Sidney Nolan, John Passmore, Howard Taylor and Fred Williams.

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Authentic Determination
A collaboration between South Australian-based artist Brigid Noone and the Cruthers Collection of Women's Art. 

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


oil painting of three figures with bright auras in a room

Artist and curator in conversation

with Gemma Weston and Brigid Noone

Artist Brigid Noone and Gemma Weston (Curator of the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art) discuss the role of complex networks and shared histories embodied in the artworks that have been selected or produced for the exhibition Authentic Determination.

This exhibition features key artists from the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, including Joy Hester, Ann Newmarch and Vivienne Binns, together with new work by Noone and her peers.

Image: Brigid Noone, Lucky Bitches, 2017, oil on canvas, 75x100cm. © Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Grant Hancock


Field of black stainless steel flowers

Friday Talk

Feeling FLORA: the emotions of conservation

View the exhibition FLORA with Andrea Gaynor and join a discussion about the relationships between emotion and conservation, and how they have been expressed over time.

Andrea Gaynor is an Associate Investigator with the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and an Associate Professor in History at The University of Western Australia. Her research seeks to use the contextualising and narrative power of environmental history to solve real world problems.

Campus Partner: ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

Image: Zadok Ben-David, Blackfield (detail at exhibition opening), 2006?09, hand painted stainless steel and sand, measurements variable. Photo: Ilkka K


Image of sphere made of very tiny colourful metal objects

Can Touch This

Tactile & Verbal Description Tour

Join us for a touch and verbal descriptive tour of the current exhibitions. A trained guide delivers descriptions of the visual elements of artworks exhibited, along with tactile opportunities using mixed media and 3D printed versions of the works.

Tours are free to attend and open to companions and carers. This event is run in partnership with DADAA.

Image: Zadok Ben-David, The Other Side of Midnight, 2013, hand painted stainless steel, dia. 300cm. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne.

 

Detail of artwork made of painted wood depicting Indian deity

Art and Mindfulness

Going Slow: Human Nature + In Light of Shadows

Slow your day down by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display.

The 45-minute session involves a slow observation of selected artworks with the theme of empathy and compassion, followed by an informal discussion.

An International Slow Art Day initiative.

Image:  I. Wayan Nunkal, The Abduction of Sita, Punjung Village, Bali, Indonesia, painted wood, steel P. Bridge Collection, Berndt Museum [1982/0006.1-11]

 

Portrait of Obama wearing a suit against a green floral backgorund

Talking Allowed: The Virgin, the Madame, and the Greenie Girlie-man: an art scholar’s tale.

with Dr Ann Schilo, School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry, Curtin University

Kehinde Wiley’s recent official portrait of the former US president, Barack Obama, has caused debate over dinner tables and in conference rooms. Looking unlike the conventional figure of conservative, patriarchal power, Obama is pictured seated, amidst a forest of flora. While it has been discussed as a shift in the portrayal of American presidents, the painting has also been seen as a sign of African-American empowerment. 

Using Wiley’s portrait as a springboard for a personal reflection on portraiture, or more specifically the figure in a floral setting, Dr Ann Schilo will spin a tale that encompasses some favourite pictures from the annals of art history, a few ideas about representation and the presentation of the self, as well as a notation on the all-pervasive symbolism of flowers. In so doing, she will consider how images are embedded in their social cultural milieu and embroiled in the circulation of meanings.

Dr Ann Schilo has published widely in the visual arts, creative practice research, and cultural studies. In addition Ann works as an independent curator. Her edited volume, Visual Arts Practice and Affect: place, memory and embodied knowing was published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2016.

Image: Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama, 2018
 

Field of black stainless steel flowers

Symposium: FLORA

Current Western Australian-based research in plant science and conservation biology, traditional uses of plants, and environmental issues that challenge our future, will be discussed in a symposium presented by eminent Western Australian speakers.
  • John Curtin Distinguished Professor Kingsley Dixon is Director for the ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Mine Site Restoration (CMSR), a collaborative alliance between Curtin University, UWA, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority and six mining industry partners.

  • Vivienne `Binyarn' Hansen is a Balladong Wadjuk Yorga woman from the Bibbulmun Nation, or Noongar people, of the south-west of Western Australia. She is co-author, together with John Horsfall, of Noongar Bush Medicine: Medicinal Plants of the South-west of Western Australia (2016) UWA Publishing.

  • Professor Steve Hopper AC is Professor of Biodiversity at the University of Western Australia's Albany Centre.

  • Vicki Long is a Pilbara-based botanist, ecologist and ethno-botanist who has observed and worked with Pilbara flora for over 33 years. She has worked as an ethno-botanist with many Aboriginal groups and corporations in the Pilbara recording their traditional ecological knowledge, especially the use of plants.

Campus Partner: Institute of Advanced Studies

Image: Zadok Ben-David, Blackfield (detail), 2006-09, hand painted stainless steel and sand, measurements variable. Photo: Ilkka K


Image of sphere made of very tiny colourful metal objects

Let's Talk Shop with Claire Greenhill

Claire is a jewellery maker, landscape architect and artist who works from her home studio in Palmyra. Claire's jewellery is inspired by nature, architecture and traditional cultures.

Join us to hear Claire discuss her process of using coloured enamel, oxidisation and altered surfaces to create contrast and texture, playing with proportion and scale to create unique and contemporary work.

Claire's work will be available for sale at this event.

Image: Zadok Ben-David, The Other Side of Midnight, 2013, hand painted stainless steel, dia. 300cm. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne.

Painting of Monotora Myristica by Ellis Rowan

Artist Workshop

Create your own Tussie Mussie 

Participate in an intimate workshop for adults led by artist Alina Tang, exploring the significance of flowers in the exhibition FLORA and examining traditional Victorian meanings of flora.

Participants are invited to create their own individual Tussie Mussie - a small bouquet of flowers offered as a gift in the Victorian era, where each element represented a symbolic meaning, using an array of oral material including fresh blooms, dried flowers, dried herbs. All materials will be supplied.

The workshop will involve a guided exploration of the materials: their sensory experience, symbolic meanings, and discussion of traditional gift-giving practices.

Watch the highlights from the workshop

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Friday Talk

Reflections on shadows and light

View the exhibition In Light of Shadows and join Richard Read to closely observe and discuss the myriad stories conjured by the play of light and shadow in different cultures and within the visual arts.

Emeritus Professor Richard Read is an Associate Investigator in the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and a Senior Honorary Research Fellow in the UWA School of Design. He has published numerous texts on the relationship between literature and the visual arts, Giotto, Rembrandt, nineteenth and twentieth century art and critical theory, and complex images in global contexts.

Campus Partner: ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

Image: Kalighat, Hari-Hara (detail), 1880-1890, Calcutta, India, watercolour and silver pigment on paper. RM & CH Berndt Estate, Berndt Museum [1963/0055].


Sarah Ridhuan photo

In Light of Shadows: Curator's Talk and Tour

Explore the meanings that light and shadow embody in various cultures through the diverse array of objects in In Light of Shadows with exhibition curator Sarah Ridhuan. Consider the broad themes of mortality, memory, power and knowledge in this selection of objects from the Berndt Museum collection of works from Asia.

Sarah Ridhuan is Curatorial Assistant at the Berndt Museum working on its diverse collections and exhibitions, with a focus on the intersections of anthropology, art and museums.

Image: In Light of Shadows exhibition curator Sarah Ridhuan. Photo by Ilkka K Photography.

 

Image of girl smiling with brightly coloured posters in the background

Art+Feminism: Wikipedia Edit-o-thon

an LWAG x Paper Mountain event

Join us for Art+Feminism, a global movement to improve coverage of women artists online. 

Did you know that a 2011 survey of Wikipedia contributors found that less than 10% identify as female? Wikipedia is one of the most wide-reaching sources of public knowledge accessible, and this gender disparity greatly impacts the information shared. To help tackle this discrepancy, and in celebration of International Women's Day, Paper Mountain and Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery hosts a weekend 'Edit-a-thon'.  

All information will be provided, along with afternoon tea and refreshments. Simply bring yourself, and a laptop or tablet (don't forget your power cord). No previous Wikipedia experience required.

This free event is organised in support of the Art+Feminism international campaign

Find out more and register.  

Artwork in background: Kelly Doley, Things Learnt About Feminism #1 - #95 (installation). 2014. Ink pen on 220gm fluorescent card. 60 x 52cm (95 pieces). CCWA 956. Cruthers Collection of Women's Art, The University of Western Australia. Courtesy the artist.

 

Painting of Monotora Myristica by Ellis Rowan

Friday Talk

Flowers in a research world: genetics and honey bees

Flowers carry a multitude of iconic meanings - including love, honour and death - and have many uses, from traditional medicine to decoration. But what is their significance in a research world?

Join Monika Murcha and Julia Grassl, two leading investigators from the Plant Energy Biology Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence at UWA, and the Cooperative Research Centre for Honey Bee Products to learn about the role of plants and their flowers in molecular studies and the vital relationship between bees and flowers.

CAMPUS PARTNER: Plant Energy Biology ARC Centre of Excellence at UWA

Ellis Rowan, Monodora Myristica (detail), n.d., gouache on cream paper, 61 x 40.5cm, CCWA 759, Cruthers Collection of Women's Art, The University of Western Australia

Image of a 18 carat gold plated toilet

Talking Allowed: A van Gogh, a toilet, and the trumping of Trump

with Associate Professor Clarissa Ball, Discipline Chair, History of Art, UWA School of Design and Director, UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

In late 2017, Donald and Melania Trump asked the Guggenheim Museum if they could borrow a van Gogh painting for their White House private quarters. Their request was rejected and countered with an offer of Maurizio Cattelan's America, (2016) a fully functional 18-carat solid gold toilet that more than 100,000 people had already used. While some considered the Guggenheim?s offer a contemptible act of profanity, others claimed that the real work of art here was the suggestion that for the Trumps, a well-used toilet that reportedly cost in excess of $1 million to make was a more fitting artwork than a van Gogh.

Join us for this first Talking Allowed series event of 2018, when the complexities of this incident will be explored and we ask, what's the fuss? After all, the toilet as subject and object of art has a long and noble history.

Image: Maurizio Cattelan, America, 2016
 

Photograph of visitors speaking

CULTURE CLUB I

Art Party featuring drinks + music + door prizes + art activities + tours

Come to LWAG's Art Party to celebrate the new academic year!

Bring your friends and meet new ones. This is an opportunity for newcomers as well as regular visitors to explore the gallery and to tour the latest exhibitions: Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature, FLORA and In Light of Shadows in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.

Enjoy a free sundowner, experiment with art activities and listen to live music. You may win a door prize too! Students are particularly welcome.

Image: Opening night of Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature, FLORA and In Light of Shadows. Photo by Ilkka K Photography

 
Detail of artwork

LWAG Signs

Auslan Interpreted Tour

Experience the artwork at LWAG in Australian Sign Language. Join us for a free tour of the current exhibitions in Auslan guided by a gallery staff member and interpreter from Auslan Stage Left.

Image: Image: Opening night of Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature exhibition with artwork The Other Side of Midnight in background. Photo by Ilkka K Photography


Detail of coloured flower

Art and Mindfulness

Going Slow: Human Nature + FLORA tour

Slow your day down by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display.

The 45-minute session involves a slow observation of selected artworks with the theme of empathy and compassion, followed by an informal discussion.

An International Slow Art Day initiative. 

Image: Zadok Ben-David, Blackfield (detail), 2006 - 09, hand painted stainless steel and sand, measurements variable. Photo: Ilkka K Photography


Painting of Monotora Myristica by Ellis Rowan

Medicine and Art: Professional Development Workshops

Develop visual language and refine communication skills through close observation of artworks. Ioana Vlad and Janice Lally will guide participants to become more comfortable with ambiguity and develop reflective practice through the exploration of art and its meanings. The workshops are designed to enrich empathic skills while enhancing social and cultural awareness.
  • 1 March, Human Nature: Examine works by artist Zadok Ben-David that explore changing aspects of the natural world, embracing hope and despair, knowledge and enigma. Reflect on issues such as our relationship with nature and our views of life and death. 

  • On 12 April,explore images of FLORA that invoke a multitude of meanings and uses: including love, honour, death, medicine, beauty, and sustaining ecosystems, while discussing how we value, understand and construct our world. 

Dr Ioana Vlad MD FACEM is an Emergency Medicine Physician, Clinical Toxicologist and co-Director of Emergency Medicine Training at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, WA.

Dr Janice Lally PhD (History and Philosophy of Science) is Curator of Academic and Public Programs at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

Campus Partner: Emergency Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital.

Please note that this event is intended for medical practitioners of all levels. Each session is limited to 20 participants. 

Ellis Rowan, Monodora Myristica (detail), n.d., gouache on cream paper, 61 x 40.5cm, CCWA 759, Cruthers Collection of Women's Art, The University of Western Australia


Image of people standing in front of a large colourful circular work

Let's Meet at LWAG

For visitors living with Alzheimer's

Join us for the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery's quarterly program for people living with dementia and their carers or family members.

This event provides a forum for conversation through the shared viewing and exploration of artworks on display, highlighting themes, artists, and exhibitions at LWAG. 

Light refreshments provided.

Image: Opening night of Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature exhibition with artwork The Other Side of Midnight (2013) in background. Photo by Ilkka K Photography.


Photograph of Susan Broomhall

Friday Talk

Devastated nature: the historical role of creative arts in memorialising natural world loss

View the artwork in Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature and join Susan Broomhall as she discusses historical responses to environmental trauma through sixteenth century French poetic works.

Susan Broomhall is Professor of History at UWA and Co-director of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions specialising in gender, emotions and material culture of early modern Europe. 

Campus Partner: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions



Painting of Monotora Myristica by Ellis Rowan

FLORA Education Workshop

Professional Development for Secondary School Teachers

FLORA education kits are available for Year 12 Visual Arts (General), Year 10 Printmaking, and general school groups from lower primary to Year 12. Join educator Erin Knight in this professional development workshop to learn about the kits and their application.

Ellis Rowan, Monotora Myristica (detail), n.d., gouache on cream paper, 61 x 40.5cm, CCWA 759, Cruthers Collection of Women?s Art, The University of Western Australia


Curator Gemma Weston wearing a blue patterned dress in front of artwork

FLORA: Curator's Talk and Tour

Join Curator Gemma Weston as she reveals some of the stories behind the diverse images of  owers in the exhibition FLORA featuring works from the Cruthers Collection of Women's Art. Visit the exhibition and learn more about our ongoing fascination with  owers.

Image: Curator Gemma Weston. Photo by Ilkka K Photography.

Photograph of artist Zadok Ben-David speaking

Life and Death in Nature: Exhibition Tour and High Tea

Presented by the University Club of WA

Don't miss this opportunity for an exclusive up close and personal exhibition tour with internationally acclaimed artist Zadok Ben-David as he hosts a tour of his exhibition Human Nature as part of the 2018 Perth Festival program. Co-hosted by curator Felicity Fenner, the event starts with a tour at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery after which guests stroll through the beautiful UWA campus to the University Club for a wonderful High Tea and presentation.

2:30pm - Meet at LWAG | 3:15pm - Walk to University Club | 3:30pm - High Tea and presentation  | 5:00pm - Event concludes

Event info: 

Image: Zadok Ben-David working with volunteers. Photo by Ryan Gibson. 


Image of sphere made of very tiny colourful metal objects

2018 Exhibitions Launch

Opening night for Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature + FLORA + In Light of Shadows 

We launch the 2018 exhibitions program with the opening of three new exhibitions - Zadok Ben-David: Human Nature, presented as part of the Perth Festival and supported by the Visual Arts Program Partner Wesfarmers Arts. In Light of Shadows, presented by the Berndt Museum and FLORA, drawn from the Cruthers Collection of Women's Art.  

Event info: 

Image: Zadok Ben-David, The Other Side of Midnight, 2013, hand painted stainless steel, dia. 300cm. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne.