Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery

Public Program, Community, Access and Special Events

Further Information

All events are subject to change. To keep up-to-date with us, join our mailing list.


Black and white illustration of Indian hawkers

Talking Allowed: Why Speak English? Nationalism and the order(ing) of language in colonial Melbourne

with Dr Nadia Rhook, Lecturer, School of Humanities, and Indigenous Studies, The University of Western Australia

You probably speak English everyday, but have you ever stopped to think about how and why English came to be so widely spoken in Australia?

This talk explores the spatial order of language in 1890s Melbourne, from the boarding houses and shops of the polyglot Little Lon area to the men’s clubs, banks and Parliament of Anglophone dominated Bourke and Collins Streets. We’ll track how this linguistic order was produced through the colonisation of Kulin land and focus in on the dynamic decade of the 1890s; an era that saw the politics of Chinese and South Asian migration intensify in ways that culminated in the use of a language test to enact racial exclusion, which would remain a cornerstone of the White Australia Policy for decades to follow.

This talk opens up thinking about the ways that language works as a tool of racial inclusion and exclusion; thinking about how, and where, the ability to speak English became bound up with Australian identity.

Talking Allowed is an event series in collaboration with UWA Institute of Advanced Studies on the second Wednesday of every month, where a researcher or artist will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture, followed by discussion and debate. 

Campus Partner: Institute of Advanced Studies, UWA.

Image: Indian Hawkers


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Friday Talk

Modern Australian Landscapes in Literature

Modern Australian landscape tradition is captured in the spectrum of works selected from the UWA Art Collection by Curator Sally Quin. View the exhibition and join Associate Professor Tanya Dalziell as she discusses selected works and considers some relationships with contemporary Australian literature.

Campus Partner: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. 

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Let's Meet at LWAG

For visitors living with Alzheimer's, and their carers, friends or family

Join us for the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery’s quarterly program for people living with dementia and their carers or family members. This event provides a forum for conversation through the shared viewing and exploration of artworks on display – highlighting themes, artists, and exhibitions at LWAG.

Free to attend. Light refreshments will be provided. 

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon


Detail of artwork made of painted wood depicting Indian deity

Art and Mindfulness: Going Slow

Visual Art x Mindfulness Tour

Slow your day down by joining us for a different kind of art gallery tour. Much like a mindfulness exercise where you focus on your breathing, in this tour we settle our minds on the artwork on display.

We begin this session with a close observation of selected artworks from the exhibitions In Light of Shadows and Authentic Determination, followed by an informal discussion on themes of empathy and compassion.

This program runs bi-monthly and is open to all. Sign up for a single session or register for all dates. 

Image: I. Wayan Nunkal, The Abduction of Sita, Punjung Village, Bali, Indonesia, painted wood, steel P. Bridge Collection, Berndt Museum [1982/0006.1-11]


 
jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Can Touch This: Tactile and Verbal Description Tour

For visitors with visual impairments, and their carers, friends and family

Join us for a touch and verbal descriptive tour of the current exhibitions. A trained guide delivers descriptions of the visual elements of artworks exhibited, along with tactile opportunities using mixed media and 3d-printed models of the artworks.

Tours are free to attend and open to friends, families and carers. Light refreshments will be provided after the tour. 

Community Partner: DADAA (Disability in the Arts, Disadvantage in the Arts).   

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

LWAG Signs: Auslan Interpreted Tour

For adults with hearing loss and their friends

Experience the artwork at LWAG in Australian Sign Language. Join us for a free tour in Auslan of the current exhibitions guided by a gallery staff member and interpreter from Auslan Stage Left.

Tours are free to attend and also open to friends, families and carers. Light refreshments will be provided after the tour. 

Community Partner: Auslan Stage Left   

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Ceramic triangular sculpture by Stewart Scambler

Friday Talk: Travellers in the Land

with Dr Shino Konishi, senior lecturer at the UWA School of Humanities, and the School of Indigenous Studies

Dr Shino Konishi, a senior lecturer in the School of Humanities and the School of Indigenous Studies at UWA specialises in Indigenous history and has a particular interest in encounters between European explorers and travellers and Aboriginal people.

Join Dr Konishi to explore the installation and the forms in this exhibition. 

Image: Stewart Scambler, Fragment II (detail), 2017-2018, oxidised stoneware, dimensions variable. © Stewart Scambler. Photograph: Kevin Gordon


jarrah sculpture by howard taylor

Artist Talk: George Haynes

Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection

Join artist George Haynes who will share insights about his own work and that of his contemporaries exhibited in Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s –1960s.

Image: Howard Taylor, Bush structure, 1963, sheoak and jarrah, burnt and painted, 111 x 50 cm. The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Presented by Pola and Bronek Stein in gratitude for the life they have enjoyed in Australia since their arrival in 1939, 1995, © Howard Taylor Estate


Girl playing a xylophone musical instrument

Performance: Piñata Co-Lab

Australian Soundscapes

Co-Lab is an annual commissioning project that brings together UWA composition and percussion departments, which has produced more than 25 new works to date. In 2018, these talented young composers create new and imaginative works for percussion, inspired by works in the exhibition Modern Australian Landscapes, 1940s-1960s: Works from the University of Western Australia Art Collection.

Campus Partner: UWA Conservatorium of Music

Image: UWA Conservatorium of Music, Piñata Co-Lab.


Self portrait of artist Jenny Watson wearing a white blouse and smoking a cigarette

Friday Talk: Feminism, Collaboration and Community

with Dr Chantal Bourgault du Coudray

Dr Chantal Bourgault du Coudray teaches gender and cultural history at UWA, and is also the Academic Coordinator of the McCusker Centre for Citizenship.

Join Chantal to explore connections between feminism, collaboration and community through reference to artworks in the exhibition Authentic Determination. These include new works developed by artist Brigid Noone in response to selected works from the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, as well as works by artists in her own network.

Campus Partner: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

Image: Jenny Watson, Self Portrait (Light Fire Version) For Myself (detail), 1980, pastel and wash on paper, 56 x 76cm, CCWA 723. Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, The University of Western Australia